Infants and young children

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What vaccines does my infant or young child need and when?

Between birth and 6 years of age, infants and young children are offered free vaccines that protect them against 14 different diseases: diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio, Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib), rotavirus, hepatitis B, measles, mumps, rubella, chickenpox, pneumococcal and meningococcal diseases, influenza, and hepatitis A (indigenous children only).
 
Click on the tabs below to find out what vaccines your infant or young child needs and when. For best protection, children should get vaccinated on time, starting at 2 months of age, and follow the recommended schedule as closely as possible.
 

BC's routine vaccine schedule for infants and young children

2 months
At 2 months of age, your child should receive the following vaccines:
 
 
4 months
At 4 months of age, your child should receive the following vaccines:
 
 
6 months
At 6 months of age, your child should receive the following vaccines:
 
 
12 months

At 12 months of age, your child should receive the following vaccines:

 
18 months
At 18 months of age, your child should receive the following vaccines:
 
 
Starting at 4 years (kindergarten entry)
Starting at 4 years of age, your child should receive the following vaccines:
 
 
Annual influenza vaccination for children 6 months and older 

It is recommended that everyone 6 months of age and older should get a yearly influenza (flu) vaccination with rare exception. 

 
 
Some vaccines are given as combination vaccines (vaccines that contain more than one vaccine in a single shot), and some are given individually. Combination vaccines are safe and provide the same protection as vaccines given individually, but with fewer shots.
 
Most vaccines require more than one dose over time to produce immunity and long-lasting protection. The number of doses needed depends on the type of vaccine. 
 

Does my child need any other vaccines? 

Children with chronic health conditions may need additional vaccines or additional doses of a vaccine. If your child has a chronic condition, talk to your doctor or public health nurse about their vaccination schedule.
 
In addition to routine vaccines, your child may benefit from getting other vaccines that you can purchase. These vaccines can give your child extra protection against certain diseases. Talk to your health care provider to find out if your child has all the protection they need.
 
If you’re travelling, your child may need travel vaccines to protect them against diseases that are rare in Canada, but common in other parts of the world. You can purchase vaccines from travel health clinics, most pharmacies, and some doctors’ offices. Consult your health care provider or visit a travel health clinic as early as possible, and preferably at least six weeks before you travel. This is important because some vaccines may take several weeks to become fully effective, and others may require more than one dose.
 

Where can my child get vaccinated?

Your child can get vaccinated at your local health unit. Health units are also called public health units, community health centres, or primary care homes in some areas of BC. Some family doctors and nurse practitioners also give vaccines. Pharmacists can vaccinate children who are five years of age and older. Services vary across BC.

It’s best to book your child’s appointment well in advance as clinics book up quickly.  This helps to ensure your child is vaccinated on time.

 

More information:

 
Date last reviewed: 
Thursday, Jul 28, 2022