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If you are eligible for the publicly funded (free) hepatitis A and/or B vaccines, you can get vaccinated at your local public health unit or pharmacy (most but not all pharmacists in BC provide vaccines). Some family doctors also provide vaccines.  

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We assume your daughter is a student of a health care profession and was tested to determine her protective status for hepatitis B.  As per the BCCDC immunization guidelines, if a student of a health care profession has an anti-HBs (hepatitis B surface antibody) level of < 10IU/L, but detectable, one dose of the vaccine should be given and then a retest should be done.

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Most vaccines (including all vaccines that are routinely recommended in BC) do not require a prescription.  We do not have a list of all of the vaccines that do not require a prescription.  However, all of the vaccines routinely recommended for adults in BC are available without a prescription.

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People with documentation of 2 doses of measles-containing vaccine (usually given as the MMR Vaccine) at 12 months of age and older and given at least 4 weeks apart are considered immune to (protected against) measles. 

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